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Second level
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Fourth level
Fifth level
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  Collaborative nature of the development of materials
  On-going dialog and interchange of ideas strengthened the end-product
  The variety of points of view and areas of expertise produced a very robust   
    series of lessons and web-site
 
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This is the final assessment done at the end of the unit.
What have they learned?
How have they changed their view of the world and the stars, planets and moons in it?
Here you see graphic evidence!
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Example of pre and post—
1.  Mythologized fictional version of the Sun. “Pokey Things”
2.Scientific rendering—
The Sun as part of a system
The blackness of space
Notion of orbits and revolution
Day and Night
Sun spots.
A more comprehensive and scientific sense of the Sun and the solar system emerges.
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This is the final assessment done at the end of the unit.
What have they learned?
How have they changed their view of the world and the stars, planets and moons in it?
Here you see graphic evidence!
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This is the final assessment done at the end of the unit.
What have they learned?
How have they changed their view of the world and the stars, planets and moons in it?
Here you see graphic evidence!
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This is the final assessment done at the end of the unit.
What have they learned?
How have they changed their view of the world and the stars, planets and moons in it?
Here you see graphic evidence!
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We used whole-class non0-fiction reading to introduce information and new  
 vocabulary
Students kept a “Science Word Wall” throughout the unit
  Many different modes of learning are integrated throughout the lessons—we  
  to ensure success for all students
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109 Earths span the Sun’s diameter (represented by 109 ½-inch adhesive dots)
4 Moons span the Earth’s diameter (represented by 4 pins)
How many Moons span the Sun’s diameter?  436!
Great mode and a good focus for Science World Wall!
( Can’t help but notice a 5 foot Sun!)
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109 Earths span the Sun’s diameter (represented by 109 ½-inch adhesive dots)
4 Moons span the Earth’s diameter (represented by 4 pins)
How many Moons span the Sun’s diameter?  436!
Great mode and a good focus for Science World Wall!
( Can’t help but notice a 5 foot Sun!)
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  Students can’t comprehend an eclipse without knowing about shadows
  This activity builds upon  their own experience of the world and provides a  
  concrete experience of the Sun creating a shadow on the Earth
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  The next step was to shift the scale of our shadow discussion, moving from small   
    shadows to one large shadow
  Day and Night—one has to understand that the Sun and Earth form a system 
   and through the turning away of the Earth from the Sun—we are in a  shadow that we  
   call  “Night”
  Students experience being in that shadow every night—this activity makes them  
   aware of what night really is
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  Our next lesson looks at motion of the Sun and Earth
  Outside we replicate the rotation and revolution of the Sun and Earth
  Students take on the roles of the Sun/Earth—
  Students act out the spinning Sun and Earth and the path of the Earth’s orbit.
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We introduced the topic of eclipse through a whole-class read aloud
Branley’s Eclipse Darkness in Daytime
Aronson’s Nature’s Blackouts Eclipses
Then we created this model in the class
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Once location, size and motion are explored students may still be confused and ask, “ If the Moon is so small how does it manage to hide that giant Sun?”
This lesson allows students to explore that question.
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Student portfolios—putting together all the hard work for peers, parents and teachers to see!
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What do your student and you gain by using these materials?
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